Any suggestions?

Hello parrot lovers ,I am planning on getting a parrot within a month, and I would like to know which parrot would be the best for me! I live in a house, 4 bedrooms, currently in school and will have time to take care of the parrot. I am looking for a parrot that is cuddly, affectionate and friendly. I would like to have a parrot that can talk and do tricks! It would be nice if the parrot is quite, but not too loud. I currently reside in toronto, and would like to know where i can find handfed parrots. I would love to have a parrot that is VERY clean! I would like it to be potty trained to an extent, and not just poop anywhere, but a designated area. The cleanliness part is the biggest factor!. This might be too much to ask for in a parrot, but anything close to these characters would be wonderful!Please suggest parrots that are both, expensive and inexpensive, and at what age they should be for me to buy them. In particular, I want a young parrot!Thank you for you time, MoneyKing (to-be parrot lover)

even parrots with talking ability will choose not to talk, they are messy and loud. they can be potty trained but it takes time. the only parrots i know of that have all the requirements on your list can be found at a toy store and take batteries. handfed birds can have mental and physical problems later on in life. there is a thread on here that goes into all the problems handfeeding causes called why you should never buy an unweaned bird. but if you’re still interested in a parrot you should go spend time at a rescue first. at a rescue you can handle many different types and see how life really is with a parrot.

I’m sorry but I’m with pennyandrocky - the only parrot that will fit your requirements is a stuffed parrot. Parrots are incredibly messy, I am constantly amazed at the mess my little Sennie can create in a matter of minutes. They DO poop and, while it’s possible to potty train them it will take take time and will not be 100%. There is no guarantee that your bird will talk, some do, some don’t, whatever the breed. Neither is there any guarantee that your bird will be cuddly and affectionate, some are, some aren’t. And all parrots are loud some of the time! Plus, you mention that you’re in school so have plenty of time. Your parrot might live 30-50 years. What happens when you’re not in school any more, but working full time? Please think very carefully about what you’re taking on…you say you want a parrot but your description simply doesn’t fit a parrot. As pennyandrocky suggested, please take some time to be around real parrots and then you can make a more informed decision.

Lots of parrots are not cuddly, some are. You have to tame a parrot to be friendly and is not at all easy, can be a long process and really tests your patience. As per mentioned in the above posts, not all parrot will talk at all. All parrots are VERY messy, you’ve no idea how many times I sweep every day. Potty training is a long process (wiping droppings every now and then isn’t hard) And all parrots are loud. If you really want a pet that is affectionate, cuddly and playful all the time, get a dog. If you want a pet that enjoys being stroked and relaxing, get a cat. If you want a pet that is small and low maintenance, get a millipede. Theres so much to getting a pet parrot. Bird proofing, largely expensive vet checks, large cage, lots of toys, flight, etc etc. I’m all for the rescue idea, an ideal way to see how life with a parrot is like.

Wot they said.Its all true.

Not to mention the awkwardness of finding an AVIAN vet you can’t just take your bird to a normal vet. It’s worse than useless. These are way more expensive than your average vet and will require perhaps travelling across large distances. These check ups will need to be repeated every 6 months or as needed without fail regardless of whether you have the money or not. A baseline check up in the UK is £25-£30 but runs up quickly if tests are performed. A simple xray runs into £100’s and blood tests cost £60-£80. Medications also cost money. The costs associated with the bird are high. A decent cage is a minimum of £100, for my cockatiel his was £130. You need top ensure correct sizes AND bar spacing. Then there’s the perches, you will need a selection of shapes and size of natural woods, proper perches don’t come cheap like Java perches. A small perch (just one) is £8.99 and you will need a number which you can switch in and out so the bird doesn’t get bored. Additionally, toys, the same goes for these. And don’t be fooled by thinking that’s an easy matter. Finding safe toys is not easy or cheap. If the toy is cheap, most likely its dangerous, my toys are either hand made using kits from the natural bird store uk, online or ordered directly from them. These need to be changed and rotated to prevent boredom. These will also get destroyed by some birds so will need replacing. Cage linings, a hidden expense. Shavings are not safe, despite pet shops and several retailers saying they are, they aren’t. I use organic kitchen towel with no dye. Also you will need f10 disinfectant you can’t use household disinfectants. That doesn’t come cheap either! Not to mention your base and linings will need to be fully cleaned at least once per day along with the food bowls.Onto food, now you will need to prepare fresh foods every day for the bird including fruits and veg but these can only remain in the cage for 2 hours. They will then need removing. You will then need to teach the birds to eat these, they won’t always just eat them themselves.The same goes for pellet transition which will need to be completed, an all seed diet is very bad for the bird. You will need to research what percentage of the diet is suitable as its different across differnt birds.This can take months and you have to monitor the weight of the bird and put up with a lot of noise!Bird poop, just deal with it in the nicest way possible. Birds poop. They are animals. their poop doesn’t smell although it can get a bit messy but that the sacrifice you make when you have a bird. So its not all that bad if you clean up everyday.Also NO bird is clean it doen’t happen!Oh and bird proofing the home, now your bird should be flighted. Clipping the bird should not be something you consider although many people do it in the false belief it makes their bird safer and won’t fly away. Unless the bird has a medical reason why it doesn’t fly then the bird should remain fully flighted. The house will need some adapting. You can’t use ANY non stick cookware with teflon so all the pots and pans in the house will need replacing with stainless steel or glass. Also you can’t use any perfumes, candles,air freshners, spray deodrants or any strong fumes. Anything you cleaned the house with before is gone and must be replaced. The blinds must be down when the bird is out so the bird can have some protection if it flies into the windows, however please ensure that the loose strings are tucked away to preent hanging or the bird getting stuck. Any loose cables will need to do the saem. Every cable should be put into a protective tubing. Also any metals round the house should be away from the bird. Birds chew and this can result in heavy metal poisoning. I agree with the above. I have hand raised and parent raised birds and although at the moment both are cuddly breeding seasons cause a number of hormonal behaviours. The cuddliest of birds will/can turn and start nipping you. Even the most well trained birds can’t stop their own natural hormones. Hand reared isn’t the answer to making it easier for you as it can cause problems later. Having a hand reared wasn’t a choice for us as our bird chose us when we made the decision to get the next bird it was parent raised. This takes time to train, in fact it can take months to years to get the bird to be fully trained and even once that’s done it must be maintained forevermore. You should also consider the establishment. Its best to go to a rehoming centre or failing that to a reputable breeder. Most pet shops have interbred birds with a host of bacterial infections so don’t be tempted.Additionally, there is the concept that birds will live longer than you are able to keep giving the time for them hence a lot of birds are rehomed. Commiting to a bird is a life long commitment and at this moment in time being in school is not the optimal time to adopt/buy a bird.

pennyandrocky wrote:even parrots with talking ability will choose not to talk, they are messy and loud. they can be potty trained but it takes time. the only parrots i know of that have all the requirements on your list can be found at a toy store and take batteries. handfed birds can have mental and physical problems later on in life. there is a thread on here that goes into all the problems handfeeding causes called why you should never buy an unweaned bird. but if you’re still interested in a parrot you should go spend time at a rescue first. at a rescue you can handle many different types and see how life really is with a parrot.I totally understand your point, but the criteria I explained above was just a guideline for the parrot. I totally understand if the parrot is not capable of doing everything, but I am looking for a parrot that will best fit those criteria and parrots that I can train to fit that criteria. So weaned birds are better than hand fed birds?

Parent reared make better pets for people who are prepared to spend the time training them. They generally have less problems. Any parrot however they are raised should be weaned.

yes parent raised birds are better they need to learn to be birds from their parents. if you want a bird to fit everything on your list i would check a rescue. the benifits of a rescue vs. a new baby is it has already reached maturity, a time that most parrots go to the rescue because it can be very hard for some people to handle. they go from a cuddly baby to a hormonal teen that starts to scream and bite out of sexual frustration. another reason is the talking like i said before some birds just never talk. you can adopt one who already speaks from a rescue and teach it new things to say. i adopted my from a rescue she already said a few things and is still learning more. mya also came potty trained. the messy part is something you can’t get around no matter which way you go they need to rip things apart to keep from being bored. if you don’t provide things for them to chew or shred they will pluck and even self mutilate. mya flew down to my kitchen last week got into my pantry and threw everything out onto my kitchen floor. they chew furniture, i’ve yet to meet anyone with a parrot who doesn’t have tears in their furniture and chew marks on walls/trim. my curtains have little holes from them climbing up and down. this is what life will be like for at least 30+ years. they are wastefull too have the food you buy for them will be tossed. if you’re ready for all of this then go to visit a rescue even if you plan on a baby from a breeder they will be happy to let you play with all the different types.

Thank you for your input, I’ll definitely look more into it!