Ever thought about running a parrot rescue?

Has anyone ever thought of taking something like this on? Its such a big undertaking. Lately I’ve been thinking about it (not in the near future) but some day I would like to sort of run a small rescue service that takes in abused and unwanted parrots, rehabilitates and re-homes them. I guess its just a pipe dream for now. But after rescuing those two little parrots I feel like it just suits me. I love giving them a new (temporary) home, building up their strength, working on simple commands like “step up”, etc. It is very rewarding.I realize it must be harder with larger birds (Macaws, amazons, 'toos), but like I said, this isn’t something I’m going to do anytime soon, but its just something to think about.Has anyone ever considered doing this?

I like that idea. Where do you find parrots to be rescued? I want to be an avian vet when I’m older, and maybe I can help rescue parrots in my free time… though I also want to be a computer engineer. But I like the idea.

I’d love to start a parrot rescue when I am older! As long as I have a big enough house for the birds, the money to create a bird room for them, the money for the cages and toys and food and the time to play with and care for the birds.

i thought about it but after seeing what the woman who runs the rescue i got mya from goes through daily i could not handle it. one thing is there are no laws protecting birds she gets calls all the time about birds in horrible conitions daily and she can’t do anything unless the owners surrender.there was a pair of m2s who were bought by a breeder but they were brother and sister so he put them out on a porch in a filthy cage with no toys,or perches she tried to get him to give them to her but he said they would stay where they are until they were bought or died.somday when we get a bigger house i will foster for her.

I would not plan to run a parrot rescue but would not turn down any parrot who needed me.

Maybe if I won the lottery!!!

Zooey wrote:I like that idea. Where do you find parrots to be rescued? I want to be an avian vet when I’m older, and maybe I can help rescue parrots in my free time… though I also want to be a computer engineer. But I like the idea.if you want to be an avian vet you should be a wildlife avian vet. with rescue and release programs. for local conservation groups

TheNzJessie wrote:Zooey wrote:I like that idea. Where do you find parrots to be rescued? I want to be an avian vet when I’m older, and maybe I can help rescue parrots in my free time… though I also want to be a computer engineer. But I like the idea.if you want to be an avian vet you should be a wildlife avian vet. with rescue and release programs. for local conservation groupsI want to be an avian vet in animal hospitals because of my past. Snowball passed away even when she was under medication and help from the hospital, so I thought, “There has to be a better way to help these birds.” And I’m going to find it.liz wrote: I would not plan to run a parrot rescue but would not turn down any parrot who needed me.I think that that’s what I will do.

I wouldn’t do it.For one, most rescues I’ve seen quickly get over run. A lot of rescues also seem to think that parrots are better off with them than someone else and adopting out happens less and less but parrots coming in continues…and quickly the place is overrun with parrots, space is an issue. There is also a lot of costs associated with running a rescue; food, toys, cages, vet bills - and I do believe that the vet is very very important in this situation because birds come in from any situation and might be carrying diseases and when brought in a location with many other birds, it can spread quite easily. I honestly would rather help by connecting a person looking to rehome their bird with someone looking to adopt - I’ve already made a few of these types of connections and they have been successful!

As someone already running a reptile/amphibian rescue I can only imagine how much of a task bird rescue would be.From my own experience I can certainly say that ANYONE looking to get into such a thing should have a very good source of income. From utilities, housing supplies, enrichment items. I spend nearly 1/3 of my total income on the animals alone. This is something I support almost entirely out of my own pocket with only a very tiny percentage offset by donations, adoption fees, surrender fees, etc.Then there’s the time aspect.I spend at minimum 2hrs a day in the “reptile room” alone, then factor in the “feeding days” for the snakes, every other day I chop & prepare fresh fruits and veggies for the herbivors. Some of the more “intelligent” reptiles need regular interaction. I also work full time at a “normal” job on top of this. My vacations are generally spent at home accomplishing some task needed for the improvement of the rescue.You also have to be well prepared for the less pleasant stuff like having to go pick up animals from severe neglect and abuse situations while keeping on a professional “face” to the person guilty of the neglect. Having to make the decision to euthanize an animal who is just not improving in health & is suffering, having animals pass away regardless how much you tried to improve their chances.Are you comfortable with screening potential adopters? Are you willing to educate the public on the care? Can you bring yourself to draw the line and say “no” when you really can’t take in that animal for either lack of space, or the ability to meet the needs of that animal? Are you comfortable with daily veterinary procedures such as administering medication, shots, pills, etc. to animals that are not tame, agressive, or nearly “wild” due to poor socialization or neglect from it’s previous owner?It’s a HUGE undertaking and not something I would recommend to anyone but those who are completely dedicated to the task. It can be incredibly rewarding and a great way to feel like you’re giving something back to this drab world, but it is also incredibly time consuming.