How to rehome in the UK? Lovely Patagonian Conure needs home

(Previously posted in General care and since realised it probably should have come in here!)Hi all,I was looking for a bit of advice on how to re-home a parrot in the UK?I accidentally became the carer for a very affectionate (and expressive!) Patagonian conure - Roger. It was supposed to be a short term arrangement- as Roger’s previous owner didn’t have long to look properly, I was persuaded to take Roger in, and properly take the time to find him a good home…That was 2 years ago! Needless to say, my partner and I fell a bit in love with Rog and after hearing all of the stories of how few parrots stay with the same owner throughout their life, felt really sad to think of him being passed on. Roger was only 1 year old when he came to us, so is now 3. My partner and I both work all day and recognise that we do not have a lifestyle that is fair on Rog (we’re also young, pre-family and previously preferred to be outdoors and travelling). But we’ve really struggled to find a legitimate option for rehoming him.I refuse to put him up for sale as I just don’t want gumtree curiosity seekers coming in and oggling him. I would far rather that he went for free, cage and all, to a home that could be his forever.Does anyone have any suggestions? I’ve only seen a couple of sanctuary options, but Roger loves human contact and I’m not convinced that these would suit him. Better yet, does anyone have a Patagonian Conure shaped hole in their heart which needs filling?

Maybe a harness and a sweater when it’s cold and a little training roger would love to travel and be outdoors with you you might be surprised how adaptable to the outside birds become when given a chance. I have a few that go everywhere with me ( very large ones ) so I can’t imagine roger being to much of a problem hanging with you when you travel and small enough to smuggle into anywhere. After 2 years he is your family, please reconsider BW

Thanks, that’s an interesting idea! Any advice for trying that? How do you go about getting them used to that? I do still think we’re not around enough for him (he definitely couldn’t come to work!). Finding care for him if we want/need to go away is near impossible and ££ and I worry more for future life changes. We struggle now and life is supposedly relatively simple pre-kids. I love him to bits, but it is one mother of a commitment and was always supposed to be about finding him a better home, I’ve just taken my sweet time because he is very loveable and I want to do it right.

I am always for people making ‘adjustments’ to their lifestyle so as to ‘accommodate’ the bird’s needs but traveling is not something that can work out for parrots - they are not ‘equipped’ for dealing with change. They evolved to be born, live all their lives and die surrounded by their family and in the same territory. They don’t migrate, they don’t explore and they only venture out of their known territory when it’s a matter of life and death so exposing them to new people and new places all the time is terribly stressful to them. You are a young couple and, as such, will have to go through many changes until your life ‘settles down’ to a steady routine that won’t change for years - you will move, change your job, have children, etc. And, if you find the very long term commitment of caring for a parrot already daunting, the best thing for him will be to go to a home where he will be cared for, cherished and loved for many years to come. I don’t believe any longer in the ‘forever’ home for parrots - there is no such thing. Not when we take into consideration their longevity and our lifestyle nowadays, full of imponderables. The days when the son inherited the father’s business and lived in the same town all their lives are gone. Most of us are three paychecks away from destitution and even people with large financial resources can fail them (look at the hundreds of parrots left homeless in the Coombs sanctuary!). We go through all kinds of ups and downs and have all kinds of ‘changes’ (divorce, disease, new job in another city, etc) in our lives so expecting anybody to keep a parrot all their life is a wonderful notion but not really what one would call realistic. The best we can all do is take real good care of them while they are with us and, of course, try our very best to keep them for as long as we can BUT when we reach a point where we realize that we are no longer benefitting the bird and that there could be somebody out there that could do a better job, it’s time to let go.

Your probably right , but dam she sounds like such a good mom and I know all to well what the possibilities for there future holds. I have 2 of my girls that absolutely love going on rides and the more adventure the better. But I’m sure that’s not very common. BW. P S I also bought an electric 4 wheeler a few years ago ( no fumes ) and they love to ride

If the two girls that love going on rides are cockatoos, I believe you. My Freddy has no problem whatsoever going for a ride in the car, going outside and walking up and down the sidewalk, meeting new people, etc. so, yes, there are birds that are fearless, gregarious hams and which don’t appear to mind at all been in an unfamiliar place or meeting strangers but I think they are the exception to the rule and not the norm. At least, that has been my personal experience because, of all the birds I’ve had, he is the only one (not even my other cockatoos were like him) But even him I would not expose to constant change…

May I tell you my story?I got my Patagonian in 1984. I was fearing getting evicted due to his noise, and my family at the time HATED him. I recall struggling to make a decision, sitting on the floor of my townhouse, watching him race and skip and frolic around on the tile floor, and then run to me GRINNING, so proud to be showing off for me. I would just stare at him and be amazed: imagine — a real parrot in my house, and it loved me! I felt so guilty and inadequate and afraid at one point that I had him in his travel cage and was planning to take him back to the bird store. I opened the front door and couldn’t go through. Closed it. Sat down. Took my little love out and promised him we would stay together. I didn’t really believe it, but I wanted to. Eventually, I did. I was in college back then, and at least I could spend a lot of time with him. Then there were years (about 25 of them) when 5-6 days a week, I was gone at 7:30-ish and back at 6-ish. Some did and will consider me wrong and think I should have re-homed him. My husband at that time detested the bird. My current ol’ man tolerates him with good humor. No, the bird wasn’t responsible for the first marriage’s ending! Anyway, here is what I think made it work. I moved and got new jobs maybe 5 times or so. BUT… Every morning, he had at least ten minutes, and every evening, he had 20 or so. I have always kept him on a natural light schedule, in a separate room, so sometimes those times together were in the dark. During the day, he had a big window looking out on something interesting, a television on one of his favorite channels (Music channels, CNN - he loves talking heads), a biggg cage, lots of fun foods, and a few toys that I changed out regularly). He KNEW he could count on those two crummy sessions a day. Somehow we both made it. I’m now retired and times are good again. Side-note… when I first started being able to spend much more time, he was strangely aggressive and jumpy. Eventually we settled down. I don’t know if I am doing a service or a dis-service in even suggesting you keep your bird. I do know I can’t imagine life without mine at this point. Good luck to you, whatever you do. Thank you for helping this bird! And welcome to the Forum… you’ll get lots of empathy and advice here.

I am in Uk and happy to give a home to a parrot!Why don’t you ask on here . I suggest that whoever takes him that you ask that the people stay in touch and keep you updated on his progress. Even to visit their home so you do know where he will be and be free to visit him if you so wish. If possible try to get to know the people first until you’re satisfied he will have a good loving home. A genuine re homer would not object to these requests at all.

alienlady wrote:I am in Uk and happy to give a home to a parrot!Why don’t you ask on here . I suggest that whoever takes him that you ask that the people stay in touch and keep you updated on his progress. Even to visit their home so you do know where he will be and be free to visit him if you so wish. If possible try to get to know the people first until you’re satisfied he will have a good loving home. A genuine re homer would not object to these requests at all… How far apart are you two and did you send a pm???

Bird woman wrote:alienlady wrote:I am in Uk and happy to give a home to a parrot!Why don’t you ask on here . I suggest that whoever takes him that you ask that the people stay in touch and keep you updated on his progress. Even to visit their home so you do know where he will be and be free to visit him if you so wish. If possible try to get to know the people first until you’re satisfied he will have a good loving home. A genuine re homer would not object to these requests at all… How far apart are you two and did you send a pm??? I think I may be too far away Bird woman as I am halfway up England. No I didn’t send a pm perhaps I should?. I came here today to suggest the owner checks if there are any Parrot clubs in her area, maybe they could help her. I will take him gladly but as I said I’m probably too far away for her.