If I were to get another Budgie

If I were to get another Budgie, I plan to actually house the Budgie with my two current male Budgies, since I just moved them into a LARGE flight cage. The two birds I currently have right now aren’t very tame, because they’ve really bonded together. Skittles doesn’t like hands, but does enjoy head scratches and even some shoulder time with me. However, if you grab him he’ll have a total squawking fit! He doesn’t bite, just nibbles. Nico, on the other hand, is a biter, and I mean a BITER! He doesn’t like humans, he flies away from you to get back to Skittles. So I want a Budgie that will like me, but will also enjoy the company of other birds, so that they can all live together. So, how would I go about taming him? I was thinking I would put him in another cage and tame him, and then move him into my other birds’ cage, but I’m scared that he won’t like other birds if he’s tame. The cage I have right now definitely is large enough to hold 3 or even more Budgies comfortably. My two Budgies right now don’t even know what to do with all the space, they literally stayed huddled up together on one perch, but it’ll take them a bit to get used to their new home, but they’ll love it!

I used to put things at different levels in their cage so they would use the whole cage. I just made sure that one perch isn’t over another.Your two boys are bonded. Where would the next budgie be while the boys are hudling together? I would stick with the 2 boys I have and work with them.

Agree with liz. I doubt the bird would live with the other 2 yet remain tame. In my opinion if you isolated the new one, tamed it up then out of the blue thrust it into a cage with other budgies it will be stressed out no end.And a quick sidenote, no matter how tame a budgie is you wont be able to hold it, they are just content to stand on you.The relationship you crave with a bird would be more suited to a friendly human bonded cockatiel, i dont normally make recommendations to youngsters to get birds but you do seem pretty persistent.Do you have a bird room?

No, he won’t be stressed out when put in the cage but, for one thing, you can’t have an odd number of budgies unless you have more than 6 of them (I have three right now but I am looking for more).No budgie likes to be grabbed (for that matter, no bird really likes it, some of them put up with it but it’s not something they enjoy -it’s what a predator would do with its mouth so none of them really likes it)

stevesjk wrote:Agree with liz. I doubt the bird would live with the other 2 yet remain tame. In my opinion if you isolated the new one, tamed it up then out of the blue thrust it into a cage with other budgies it will be stressed out no end.And a quick sidenote, no matter how tame a budgie is you wont be able to hold it, they are just content to stand on you.The relationship you crave with a bird would be more suited to a friendly human bonded cockatiel, i dont normally make recommendations to youngsters to get birds but you do seem pretty persistent.Do you have a bird room?Stevesjk, I’m assuming when you say a “bird room” you mean a room that is used for the birds only. The answer: nope, I do not. The reason: there are simply not enough rooms in my house for everyone who lives here, let alone for the birds. There are 5 people in my family who live here: my mom, my dad, my sister, my brother, and me. My mom and dad share a room, my brother has a room, my sister has a room, there are 2 bathrooms, 1 kitchen, 1 dining room, a living room, 1 laundry room, and lastly there’s “my” room. As the youngest and with there being no rooms left in the house, my parents just put a bed in this room that was already an office/playroom, and now we call it my bedroom/the office/the playroom. Now, if I could I would make this room also a bird room as well. However, this room that I sleep in is connected to a small hallway, and the hallway is connected to the kitchen. There is no door in between my room and the hallway, but there is a door in between the hallway and the kitchen, and with no where else to put it, we had to put my cat’s litter box in that hallway that is connected to my room. If I had a door between my room and the hallway so that I could keep the cat out of my room but she still had access to her litter box, I would definitely make my room a bird room. My birds’ cage is located in my room, but no, I would not consider this a bird room.

UPDATE: Skittles and Nico are adjusting well to this cage! With Skittles being a climber, he has been climbing up and down the cage, as well as hopping around on the perches. Nico is taking a bit more time to adjust, but I think they like the room this cage allows.

I just asked out of curiosity because here in britain the houses are generally smaller than in america so we tend to live closer with our birds as they live in our living rooms where as houses in america are normally bigger so the americans are more inclined to have designated birdrooms.Anyway the problem with sleeping in the same room as a cockatiel is they are very dusty birds so can be bad for your chest so id advise removing the cage at night.

Hmmm, I don’t know if we are more prone to having birdrooms because the houses are larger. I know my husband and I don’t rent or buy a house that has less than four bedrooms or rooms that can be used separately even though there is only my husband and I because we need two bedrooms (one of them the guest room -lots of children and grandchildren that visit), at least, one room for the birds and another one for the cats (so they can be locked up for the birds to come out to fly). I think it’s more a matter of deciding what kind of infrastructure you need and then looking for that or for a design that will allow you to ‘create’ the needed infrastructure (for example, I require ‘buffer’ zones at the doors to the outside but, if there aren’t any, I make them).