Opinion of the Blue eye?

I’ve made it clear that in a few years I hope to bring a cockatoo into my life (just as my wife wants a blue and gold macaw). Out of curiousity, does anybody know the following:Their opinion of the blue eyesAverage PriceA trust-worthy sellerI do aim to get a baby. But like I said, it won’t be for a few years (once I feel confident as a african grey owner).

I have blue eyes and lily bonds with me closer than anyone in my family.(let alone the outside of lily’s eyes ARE blue)average price is about 1000$ but i privately rescued my lily for free. they also typically cost 300-500$ in rescues.

GMV wrote:I have blue eyes and lily bonds with me closer than anyone in my family.(let alone the outside of lily’s eyes ARE blue)average price is about 1000$ but i privately rescued my lily for free. they also typically cost 300-500$ in rescues.So you’d say the Blue Eye Cockatoo can be a good choice to an experienced owner?

NICrosis wrote:GMV wrote:I have blue eyes and lily bonds with me closer than anyone in my family.(let alone the outside of lily’s eyes ARE blue)average price is about 1000$ but i privately rescued my lily for free. they also typically cost 300-500$ in rescues.So you’d say the Blue Eye Cockatoo can be a good choice to an experienced owner?I am afraid i know little about the blue eyed, but i would say all cockatoos are for experienced bird owners, and i will admit i probably got lily with too little experience, and i still probably have too little experience, but i’m not giving up on Lilian.

I don’t have any personal experience with Blue Eyed 2s but any bird will work out with anybody as long as this person is knowledgeable, experienced, has no specific expectations and provides for that particular species needs. I don’t believe in buying babies from breeders but, even adult adopted cockatoos require A LOT of personal attention and that will be hard to provide with a macaw and a gray already in the house (even if you don’t work at all which I assume you do) because all three species are needy and possessive ones and there just aren’t that many hours in the day - meaning, in most cases, you can’t let them all out at the same time and need separate one-on-one and that means 12 hours, during the daylight hours, of birds and nothing else. I stay at home and my entire life revolves around my birds but I know I cannot do it. I have three birds that require one-on-one and I am lucky that I can have both the Red Bellied and the GCC out at the same time (GCC rides my shoulder all the time, boyfriend climbs and chills by himself on top of the cage and ARB just flies around back and forth and perches in front of my face to ask for scritches every few minutes which the GCC does not mind as long as the ARB doesn’t perch on me) but I need to do the Senegal separately (intensely jealous of my paying attention to anybody -human, dog, cat, bird) and I’ve had to get up earlier than I usually do this time of the year (5:30 instead of 6 am) and do my shopping in the evening just so I will have enough time for all of them. I just would not have enough time to do three separate ones like the Senegal and all three species you mentioned (macaw, gray and too) tend to be like the Senegal in that they think they own you.

I am disabled so I stay at home and am hard pressed to provide adequate one on one time for my Grey, Senegal and Parrotlet. They are good but each of them think that I belong to them alone.

Pajarita wrote:I don’t have any personal experience with Blue Eyed 2s but any bird will work out with anybody as long as this person is knowledgeable, experienced, has no specific expectations and provides for that particular species needs. I don’t believe in buying babies from breeders but, even adult adopted cockatoos require A LOT of personal attention and that will be hard to provide with a macaw and a gray already in the house (even if you don’t work at all which I assume you do) because all three species are needy and possessive ones and there just aren’t that many hours in the day - meaning, in most cases, you can’t let them all out at the same time and need separate one-on-one and that means 12 hours, during the daylight hours, of birds and nothing else. I stay at home and my entire life revolves around my birds but I know I cannot do it. I have three birds that require one-on-one and I am lucky that I can have both the Red Bellied and the GCC out at the same time (GCC rides my shoulder all the time, boyfriend climbs and chills by himself on top of the cage and ARB just flies around back and forth and perches in front of my face to ask for scritches every few minutes which the GCC does not mind as long as the ARB doesn’t perch on me) but I need to do the Senegal separately (intensely jealous of my paying attention to anybody -human, dog, cat, bird) and I’ve had to get up earlier than I usually do this time of the year (5:30 instead of 6 am) and do my shopping in the evening just so I will have enough time for all of them. I just would not have enough time to do three separate ones like the Senegal and all three species you mentioned (macaw, gray and too) tend to be like the Senegal in that they think they own you.Our intention is to own a bird room. Basically, a 200 (if not more) square foot room for all the birds to be in. I’ll admit, I won’t have more than 4 hours to spend personally with my 2 birds each day. But I hope to still teach them self stimulation, and make the time count.

I don’t know any cockatoo, macaw or gray that not having a mate or companion of its own would share a human with another bird willingly. Birdrooms are great for parrots and I wish everybody had one as well as several birds in it because it’s so much healthier for them but the success of a birdroom depends on the species you put in it and whether they have companion birds of their own or not because putting birds of different species that are not normally compatible and which do not love or even like each other would just isolate them from the human company they crave and make them depressed and anxious. Large species are much more deeply imprinted to humans than the smaller ones so they need either to bond with another bird (not so easy but it happens given enough time and work on the human’s part) or spend hours and hours with their human. I got a second cockatoo so the first one I took in would have a companion of its own because I firmly believe that having a companion of their own species enriches a bird’s life but it has taken over a year for Freddy not to stalk Zachary constantly and for Zachary not to be terrified of Freddy (and lots of different strategies as well as months and months of my having to keep Freddy company until the still not close but not stressful relationship was achieved).Putting birds in a room doesn’t mean that you are getting flock dynamics. It takes a long time and a lot of thought, planning, tweaking, experimenting, etc to get it -and, if you don’t know what you are doing, you end up with a room with cages in it and lonely birds.My point is that I doubt you will get any kind of flock dynamics from a macaw, a gray and a cockatoo so what you will have is three separate pet birds, in cages, in a room by themselves and, taking into consideration that they are all needy and possessive species, you will need to satisfy their emotional needs separately and that means hours and hours.