Other pets living with birds?

Do your parrots live with other animals in your house? Do you have dogs or cats that are out at the same time as your parrots, or do your other pets get put away when your birds are out? Do the animals ignore your birds or do they interact with your birds? For example I’ve seen many youtube videos of cockatoos and macaws chasing dogs or playing with cats!

My cat is in another room when my birds are out.She seems to be paying less and less attention to them (based on what we observe when she’s out and they are in their cages) but I don’t think I would ever trust her. Just don’t think it’s worth the risk.As for bigger birds with cats and dogs…I wouldn’t do it either. Just one scratch from a dog or a cat, even if only accidental, can be quite dangerous.

What I wonder, and this isn’t directed specifically at you but you just may be able to answer it, is why people would want to mix a household with parrots + other (namely cats and/or dogs). You know how folks say there are cat people and there are dog people. Well the way I see it is more like cat people, dog people, and parrot people. It seems that mixing any of those 3 is weird because they are kind of mutually exclusive. Now don’t get mad at me for making these generalizations but ball park: cats are lazy, sleep all day, kind of cuddly and like being pet. That reflects one kind of person who probably does not want something too active that would bother them much, nothing wrong with that. Then there’s dogs which are kind of a “dumb and happy” creature. I mean that in the sense that they just get happy over something really simple or over nothing at all rather than out of rational reasoning for it. Dogs seem to be more excitable, more active, and more playful then cats. People who like dogs like to be able to go outside with them, do active things, and have it just follow them around for no reason. Finally there’s parrots. They are really quite a handful because you can’t take their love/trust for granted as much as you might with the other two. Parrots are a non-stop work in progress. And it’s a very delicate balance of trust. It can easily swing to a point where parrot becomes scared, aggressive, or manipulative. I think people like them because they are INCREDIBLY SMART and because they are very challenging. They can be cuddly and really curious/funny. So personally I cannot understand how someone that likes cats could like parrots, vice verse, dogs/parrots, etc. Anyone would like to explain?

I appologize in advance for the length of this post.Personally I’m offended that you’re assuming that humans have to be such basic/simple creatures that if we like something we can’t like something else with different characteristics. I’ll start with your comment that there are certain people that like cats, certain people that like dogs, and certain kinds of people that like parrots. This isn’t true at all, maybe if you look very generally but I really don’t find it to be true. People do have preferences, but that doesn’t mean they don’t like other animals too. Just because I like to be out and active with my excitable dog doesn’t mean I can’t spend time with my ‘lazy’ cat when I’m inside. To me this is saying that because I enjoy spicy food I can’t also enjoy oat meal. Because I play jazz clarinet I can’t play classical violin. And because I love going to rock/metal/emo/grundge concerts I can’t equally enjoy going to symphonies, operas, and ballets. All things that I do, yet they’re all completely different. Stereotypically a different type of person enjoys grunge/emo music (say somebody with depression issues or a bad attitude) and a different (say more educated) person enjoys classical music. While stereotypically this may be true, I enjoy all of those things and I’m just one person. I don’t believe in stereotypes. I know you said not to get mad at the generalizations, but generalizations tend to tick me off. And I’m not mad, I just have an opinion on this. Michael wrote:cats are lazy, sleep all day, kind of cuddly and like being pet. That reflects one kind of person who probably does not want something too active that would bother them much, nothing wrong with that.I don’t really know very many lazy cats. And anybody with cats can tell you that their personalities differ so much from one cat to the next. Some cats are very needy and ‘bother’ their owners for attention all the time. Also people get cats for different reasons: to control mice, companionship when allergies or living arrangements limit their pet choices, and they like having a pet that will welcome being loved and being cuddled. Again, not all cats like that, and there are many more reasons people get cats.Michael wrote:Then there’s dogs which are kind of a “dumb and happy” creature. I mean that in the sense that they just get happy over something really simple or over nothing at all rather than out of rational reasoning for it. Dogs seem to be more excitable, more active, and more playful then cats. People who like dogs like to be able to go outside with them, do active things, and have it just follow them around for no reason.Oh, I have too much to say on how you’re so wrong about dogs, I’ll try to keep it short though. First, there are many different types of dogs, all bred for different things. Some may be working dogs, but some dogs in the toy group were bred to be little companion animals, that really aren’t that active at all. Also many older dogs get adopted because they’re not as active and their owners don’t spend a lot of time outside (such as an elderly person that wants an older dog for companionship). Second, dogs don’t just follow you around for no reason. I’ve never had my friend’s dog start following me around the house for no good reason. They follow you because they want to be with you, because you have food or a toy or something else they want, or because it’s been trained to stay at your side. Generally they just enjoy being with you and they’re very attentive and have learned to pay attention to their ‘master’.Yes, they might seem like a “dumb and happy” creature, but they are so much more than that. The fact that they can be happy “over something really simple or over nothing at all rather than out of rational reasoning for it” is actually quite inspirational, I can’t tell you how many dogs I’ve picked up from the pound that have been neglected or abused that are able to look at me, a stranger that very well might hit them like they’re used to, and be able to wag their tail and give me such a thankful look just for showing them compassion that it makes me cry. If you’ve ever interacted with an abused parrot, this is far from how they act. My dogs remind me to take the time to enjoy the little things that happen every day. They might be happy ‘over nothing’ but they’re also so intuitive that when you’re sick or sad they just know, and they know to come up to you and to just put their head in your lap and let you pet them or whatever you need to do. And they’ll tolerate it for as long as you’re feeling that way, and as soon as you’re feeling better they’ll jump up like it’s time to play because they know you’re alright now. Also they are so very far from dumb. I don’t know a single parrot that can find a person after an avalanche buried under 10 miters of snow, find narcotics hidden in a gas tank of a car, or detect any type of cancer. Also I don’t see any parrots working for people with disabilities. If you’ve ever seen a blind person down town in a busy city with nothing but their dog to guide them it’s really quite amazing. Michael wrote:Finally there’s parrots. They are really quite a handful because you can’t take their love/trust for granted as much as you might with the other two. Parrots are a non-stop work in progress. And it’s a very delicate balance of trust. It can easily swing to a point where parrot becomes scared, aggressive, or manipulative. I think people like them because they are INCREDIBLY SMART and because they are very challenging. They can be cuddly and really curious/funny. Yes, I do agree with everything you’ve said about parrots. Michael wrote:So personally I cannot understand how someone that likes cats could like parrots, vice verse, dogs/parrots, etc. Anyone would like to explain?To sum it up, people like different animals for different reasons. Just because they like one type of animal because of certain characteristics doesn’t mean they can’t like another animal with different characteristics. I love my dogs, parrot, gerbil, horse and fish. All for different reasons. There is nothing saying that just because I like cats I can’t like birds or dogs. Every animal has something different to offer. People that like doing agility (or other sports) with their dogs can still greatly benefit from and enjoy owning a parrot or cat, even though they can’t participate in sports outside with them.Most people who like birds like animals. Not just birds, they like many animals. But hey, maybe I’m the minority here and 99% of bird owners only have birds? Sorry that this got so long, I tried to make it shorter.

Mandy, I LOVE your answer. You articulated what I was thinking and struggling to write.MandyG wrote:Most people who like birds like animals. Not just birds, they like many animals. But hey, maybe I’m the minority here and 99% of bird owners only have birds? Sorry that this got so long, I tried to make it shorter.I quoted the above specifically for the first sentence. I love animals. If it was up to me, I would probably have a bearded dragon as well, but I have space issues. My cat isn’t lazy, she’s quite active. Yes, she does sleep a lot, it’s a cat thing, but when she is awake, she’s plays, watches the outside, comes for some attention, go and plays some more, etc. Her companionship is of a different kind than the one my parrots provide and it is as appreciated.I don’t like over generalization of people vs the pets they have. I do believe that some pets suit some people more, but I wouldn’t make it a very specific generalization.And I know multiple bird owners that also have a cat, a dog, both and/or some other type of animal. In fact, the ones I have spoken to that exclusively have birds tend to be in the minority and I want to say it’s probably due to a general appreciation of animals of all kinds.

Could that be because birds are more “exotic” and it’s “animal lover” people that get them in addition to the animals they already have? Or do you think people start on parrots and then expand to the other kinds of pets?Oh and please don’t get offended. I know relatively little in this field and have only limited experience with other animals. I have met other people’s cats and dogs before and that’s the perspective I have as a non-owner so it could be skewed (but on the other hand unbiased). So if you think otherwise go right ahead and say so and don’t take it personally.

I didn’t take what you said personally, but I was struggling on how to answer. Mandy pretty much said it all and in a more articulated way than I would have.Talking for me, the “exotic” aspect of parrots had nothing to do with me wanting them.I’ve always loved birds in general and got hooked on parrots with my lovebird.

But what came first for you? Aves or Felinae?

Natacha wrote:I quoted the above specifically for the first sentence. I love animals. If it was up to me, I would probably have a bearded dragon as well, but I have space issues. I have spousal issues, otherwise I’d have one! My husband is terrified of all reptiles, he was also afraid of birds so I had to compromise and had to pick the parrot or the beardie! Getting a parrot was the obvious choice Michael wrote:Could that be because birds are more “exotic” and it’s “animal lover” people that get them in addition to the animals they already have? Or do you think people start on parrots and then expand to the other kinds of pets?I’m sure many animal lovers that own parrots started with other animals. I imagine that there are also many parrot owners that knew what they wanted and have no need for any other pets so they only have parrots. I can only speak for myself of course, that’s why I started this thread, I wanted to see what other people do!The exotic part had no influence on my desire to get a parrot. For me personally I’ve always had other animals and then got a parrot in addition to the animals I already had. I’ve always wanted birds. My mom had canaries when I was growing up and after I took care of my aunt’s pair of doves for a month I was hooked. I just had to wait until I had a place of my own, enough space, enough time, and enough money to be able to properly take care of a bird.Michael wrote:Oh and please don’t get offended. I know relatively little in this field and have only limited experience with other animals. I have met other people’s cats and dogs before and that’s the perspective I have as a non-owner so it could be skewed (but on the other hand unbiased). So if you think otherwise go right ahead and say so and don’t take it personally.I wasn’t too offended, it’s obvious (not in a bad way ) that you don’t have experience owning other animals. I’m just very opinionated when it comes to my love of animals, they’re my passion.

Michael wrote:But what came first for you? Aves or Felinae?The first thing my family owned was a cat. She was a stray, most likely abandoned when people moved since she was quite familiar with humans.However, I remembered wanting a budgie for the longest time, even before we had the cat. Then again, I always wanted a cat as well. Couldn’t tell you which one I wanted first.