Parrot Breeders in Oahu

Hey!It’s been really stressful finding a parrot breeder in Hawaii that breeds more “exotic” parrots aka the ones I have my eyes and heart on. These would be members of the Poicephalus and Pionus family, but I’m looking for a Senegal/Meyers and White Capped Pionus breeders.I have met one who has Maxi Pionus’ but the initial cost of the bird itself is too high for me.So I was just wondering if you have any recommendations on parrot breeders in Oahu that breed those certain kinds of parrots. However, I’d love to meet any breeder so hopefully I can find my “perfect match” and be introduced to a wider spectrum of parrots. And for clarification, the best option for me to go is breeders. I’d really love to adopt and rescue a parrot but there is no legit rescue here, and the clubs barely get parrots in need of a home. The closest to a rescue is on the Big Island, but even transporting parrots from inner islands is EXTREMELY complicated and overall very costly. So I had to rule out getting a parrot from the Mainland. Thank you for reading to the end of this post, or skimming through!

My suggestion is to consider flying to the mainland to adopt from a rescue since it appears there aren’t any in Hawaii. Not all rescue birds are problematic rejects. There are plenty of truly wonderful/easy (or as easy as a parrot can be within the scope of reality) parrots at rescues that you could develop an instantaneous relationship with. It’s not just about finding the right species but also the right individual of the species.Getting a baby from a breeder is not indicative of how it will be as an adult. And although you have the opportunity to grow together, there are as many if not more times when the parrot/owner grow apart with age rather than together. But with a rescue, what you see is what you get. You know the good, the bad, and the ugly and can make a truly educated decision with full awareness. If a parrot will run $1500 from a breeder on Hawaii but the adoption fee at a rescue on the mainland for the same species is $500, that could cover your trip and save a bird in the process. In the long term span of things, the price is nothing. When you’re spending $1,000+ a year on keeping the parrot fed, entertained, happy, and healthy, the amount you spent to buy, adopt, or transport the bird becomes as much forgotten as dwarfed by other costs.For Senegal Parrots, I recommend Ginger’s Parrots Rescue in Arizona. She has over a dozen awesome rescue Senegal Parrots to choose from. Last time I was there, every single one would step up for me and was no trouble to handle. http://GingersParrots.org.

http://GingersParrots.org

Michael wrote:My suggestion is to consider flying to the mainland to adopt from a rescue since it appears there aren’t any in Hawaii. Not all rescue birds are problematic rejects. There are plenty of truly wonderful/easy (or as easy as a parrot can be within the scope of reality) parrots at rescues that you could develop an instantaneous relationship with. It’s not just about finding the right species but also the right individual of the species.Getting a baby from a breeder is not indicative of how it will be as an adult. And although you have the opportunity to grow together, there are as many if not more times when the parrot/owner grow apart with age rather than together. But with a rescue, what you see is what you get. You know the good, the bad, and the ugly and can make a truly educated decision with full awareness. If a parrot will run $1500 from a breeder on Hawaii but the adoption fee at a rescue on the mainland for the same species is $500, that could cover your trip and save a bird in the process. In the long term span of things, the price is nothing. When you’re spending $1,000+ a year on keeping the parrot fed, entertained, happy, and healthy, the amount you spent to buy, adopt, or transport the bird becomes as much forgotten as dwarfed by other costs.For Senegal Parrots, I recommend Ginger’s Parrots Rescue in Arizona. She has over a dozen awesome rescue Senegal Parrots to choose from. Last time I was there, every single one would step up for me and was no trouble to handle. http://GingersParrots.org.Thank you a lot for the response, I’m all about finding the right parrot, and not having a parrot that has matured (hopefully) with the hormones and other issues I’d have to face from growing older with a baby is ideal my main concern for that is the overall cost and the stress. I was hoping to spend at least 680-750 dollars overall for a parrot here. But as it is kind of my only option I have to add in the option of having to ship which can and most likely will be stressful for both of us. I’ve been putting a lot of thought into shipping and reading the regulations and adding in the cost of this situation. And adding to some personal reasons, I am a minor and my mom knows about me planning on getting a bird, but she’s not a bird person but accepts what I’m planning. This will also be by next year when I know 150% a Senegal is right for me and in the meantime I’ll be visiting different birds and breeders to find the right choice parrot for me and my lifestyle. But for now, I’d really like to visit a Senegal and see how they’re like, I’ve only met one, who is extremely docile and sociable one and not what I hear about Sennies.Here’s what I have so far:(I made it easier so it’s just to Arizona*, my mom has a plan next year as well to go to DisneyLand and San Diego Zoo)-Flight to Hawaii to Arizona with included hotel at the cheapest price: 3,039/760 per person-Price of potential Senegal: lets say around 200.-Price to have it cleared by an avian vet: 80, based on my vet-Having it quarantine for 7 days: AT LEAST 100 dollars, and the bird must be shipped in the next 36 hours.-Buying mosquito netting and carrier: Not too important but if the netting breaks they need to be sent back no matter what and have the process start all over again. -Check in pet fee from North America: 225 either way. So if the netting breaks I’ll be paying another 225.-Not to mention the requirement is that the bird must seek no attention through this 7 or 9 hour flight(?) -Can’t find the site, but the hold for quarantine again once at Honolulu is 50 for 7 days and I believe 1,800 for a month. So this comes close to $3,700 for the total cost of everything. I understand that it will all pay off with the affection of a senegal but I don’t think I could pay that off anytime soon. And I don’t plan on stressing my future bird by having him/her in another strange location, and having to bird a 7-9 hour flight only to be in another strange place for 7 days.However, hopefully when we go I won’t be paying for the hotels and flight so the 700 is more stable (I have a wobbly income but still can make money), but the stress for the bird is still there. Ginger’s parrot would be on the first of my list to go but I’m not sure how we’d travel from Cali-Arizona because it will get expensive. I have Ginger’s Parrots Rescue as my first choice of Senegals and if it comes down to it, I’ll be rescuing a bird from there.

http://GingersParrots.org

Didn’t know it was that complicated to transport a pet to Hawaii. Then it is obviously out of the question. Please don’t even consider shipping to Hawaii, only an in-person pick up. That is just too long of a flight to do unattended.

My daughter is a UH Manoa graduate. Hawaii is the only place we’ve found that is as cautious about importing agricultural products as California, so I am not surprised to hear about their parrot requirements. California has commercial reasons, but Hawaii has a very fragile ecosystem. It seems like all the native birds are endangered, so a sick parrot could potentially wipe out an entire native species. I agree that you are better off if you can find a parrot that’s already there.