Parrot Confidential on PBS

Parrot Confidential premiered on PBS tonight! It will be playing again at 1:00am, but if you can’t watch or record it, or don’t have PBS, the website also has it streaming. It is a one hour show, and talks about parrots in the wild and how they share their lives with us in captivity. I found it to be very thought provoking. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes … tial/8496/

watching it right now. heartbreaking how so many of these birds are being bought on a whim and given up or abandoned. its a touching doc and actually makes me feel a bit guilty that although i try to give mine the best, it is still no comparison to the freedom and life they would be living otherwise in the wild.if you didn’t see it tonight, do try to get your hands on it. really gives a good perspective on parrot keeping and the responsibilities we owe to them once we’ve made this choice.

cant watch it as in the UK

I was actually really lucky my dad changed it to PBS, we managed to watch and record some of it. I feel really sad for the sulfur-crested cockatoo, Peepers, who had plucked her head feathers out. ANd I can’t believe that some people threaten to euthanize their parrots if they don’t accept!! How cruel!

Actually, it’s not as cruel as you think it is because the life of a captive parrot, even in the best of homes, it’s pretty sad and depressing so imagine what it is when they go from hand to hand…

indefine wrote:watching it right now. heartbreaking how so many of these birds are being bought on a whim and given up or abandoned. its a touching doc and actually makes me feel a bit guilty that although i try to give mine the best, it is still no comparison to the freedom and life they would be living otherwise in the wild.if you didn’t see it tonight, do try to get your hands on it. really gives a good perspective on parrot keeping and the responsibilities we owe to them once we’ve made this choice.HEAR HEAR! I am so glad that I’m looking before I make the commitment of adopting a parrot. I am so glad that I know that I CANT provide a proper home right now. I am fortunate that I am here reading up and preparing! Anna Sewell was right in Black Beauty: Ignorance is the worst thing in the world other than wickedness.

I saw it, PBS shared it via Google+ and I left a long and very opinionated comment about the issue. If you’re on G+ speak out on their page and let your voice be heard.EDIT: I was asked to share the Google+ post, here it is: It is only a clip with the notice of Parrot Confidential, but for those who are on Google+ please comment and encourage PBS to share more of these educational videos.https://plus.google.com/115800475809612 … byGdez94o8I’m too lazy to bb code so here’s the pasted link. You’ll see my comments in the Google+ post – shout out to Michael, hope he doesn’t mind^^I encourage many of you to join Google+ as there’s many parrot pages and it’s an awesome social network ^^

https://plus.google.com/115800475809612886515/posts/jbyGdez94o8

marie83 wrote::frowning: cant watch it as in the UK I feel your pain!

marie83 wrote::frowning: cant watch it as in the UK Oh but you can Marie83 & Lady Saphine! Paper_lantern provided it at the beginning of the thread.paper_lantern wrote: but if you can’t watch or record it, or don’t have PBS, the website also has it streaming. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes … tial/8496/

What the documentary missing is some of the successful stories with parrots or birds in general. This kind of documentary is usually bias. But it is very informative. I am vert glad it was made to aim at those who are ignorant.Take the Lady Gouldian Finch for example. Gouldians are every finch enthusiast dream bird. Did you know that there are six folds the amount of Gouldians in captivity than in the wild? Gouldians in the wild are dwindling due to habitat loss and climate change. Today there are only about 2,500 Gouldians left in the wild despite 2 decades of effort of nest building for them to help them breed in the wild. If it wasn’t for the captive Gouldians, there is a good chance that this species will go extinct in 10 or 15 years.