Rescue adoption

DISCLAIMER: this is not bird related. Read anyways if interested. So I’m planning adopting an animal from a rescue, specifically a turtle from the local reptile rescue. We have an outdoor pond that’s big enough to house a couple, so I’m gonna wait until it’s a little warmer to actually make an appointment. What kind of turtle am I getting? Well, while I am a fan of Reeves and Painted turtles, I have a particular soft spot for red eared sliders, because while they are a very popular species to have in captivity, they are one of the most neglected. People buy them without realizing that they can grow up to 12 inches. Then, when they get too big, they get released into ponds and lakes. In result they are invasive just about every state in the U.S., and the rescue has so many of them, they’re adopting them out to anyone with a pond, without a fee.At the same time though, the rescue posted a picture of this really adorable African sideneck turtle on their Facebook page, that’s up for adoption. https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hp … e=572CD2FDI mean, just look at that face! is that not the cutest, most goofy looking face you’ve ever seen on a turtle?I’m gonna probably adopt somewhere in late February or early March (we have some short winters). In the meantime, I need to make a little dock for a basking area, get some floating plants to cover the surface of the water, and some other things. If the African sideneck turtle is still there by that time, I might need to make some extra adjustments to accommodate for the species.For those who don’t know much about turtles, here are some pictures of the other species I mentioned.Painted turtle: Reeves turtle:Red eared slider:It took me a long time to make this decision. I wanted to see how my schedule was after I started my current semester of college. I’ve done my research, and I feel that I have enough time to make sure the turtle is fed every day (they’ll eat the fish otherwise). Now I have to wait until it’s a little warmer, so it wouldn’t be too stressful on the turtle to change ponds.Questions and comments are welcome. If anyone with turtles out there has information I should know, I would really appreciate it.

https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xta1/v/t1.0-9/10414538_1084166761624423_2875928757315733687_n.jpg?oh=4c0edf2e1f07731e329ae18c5663da97&oe=572CD2FD

That is so cool! I dont have turtles (Id love one though )Can you also feed them Mealworms/Supers(Weevil larvae)? The pictures are so pretty! Congratulations with your decision to adopt a turtle!!look at this cutie:pignosed turtle https://www.google.com.au/search?q=pign … BpScbxK4XM%A

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=pignose+turtle&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari#imgrc=YdQjBpScbxK4XM

yes, worms and larvae are ok, but in moderation. Though turtles are omnivores, too much protein can cause problems, such as shell deformities like pyramiding.It’s more known to happen in tortoises than turtles though, probably because turtles are adapted to eating more protein, since tortoises are herbivores.One thing I’ve found especially interesting, is that you can actually give turtles cuttlebones for calcium. I guess it makes sense though. They need calcium for their shell to be hard, and they too have “beaks” that can be overgrown if not taken care of properly.

This has really gotton my intrest I know my Beardies need calcium dusted on their food very often so as their bones are strong and they can properally digest their food, but it isnt something I would of even thought about for turtles! Do you know if they will eat it on their own like parrots or do you have to crush it on food?? The more I learn about reptile the more I am able relate them to birds!

I think they eat them on their own. I don’t think they would always know what to do with it at first, but you can buy them in little bite-sized piecesI’ve also been told to sprinkle calcium powder as well, since I’ve owned lizards, as well as tortoises (and some turtles). I guess it could be used as an alternative to the cuttlebone, though the cuttlebone helps file their beaks down. Turtles and tortoises don’t have much in terms of internal bone structure, and they rely entirely on their shell to protect their internal organs. That’s why it’s important for their shells to be in good shape. That includes calcium to make sure the shell hardens, and proper exposure to UV, for it to grow properly. Pyramidding can cause the shell to get soft and cave in on itself, which is why too much protein is bad. You can fix that problem with a a proper diet, but sometimes the pyramids will stay, even after the shell has hardened.

JessiMuse wrote:I think they eat them on their own. I don’t think they would always know what to do with it at first, but you can buy them in little bite-sized piecesI’ve also been told to sprinkle calcium powder as well, since I’ve owned lizards, as well as tortoises (and some turtles). I guess it could be used as an alternative to the cuttlebone, though the cuttlebone helps file their beaks down. Turtles and tortoises don’t have much in terms of internal bone structure, and they rely entirely on their shell to protect their internal organs. That’s why it’s important for their shells to be in good shape. That includes calcium to make sure the shell hardens, and proper exposure to UV, for it to grow properly. Pyramidding can cause the shell to get soft and cave in on itself, which is why too much protein is bad. You can fix that problem with a a proper diet, but sometimes the pyramids will stay, even after the shell has hardened.Thankyou, I did not know this !

When I was young I had baby Red Ears. Looking back, no matter how much I loved them it was really cruel. I think they now have a ban on selling them.As a volunteer at NC Zoo wildlife rehab I was only allowed near the birds and reptiles because I could not take the rabies shots to work with furries. There were only 3 turtles that I interacted with. I did not touch the ones who had their shells pinned together with metal. I was afraid I would hurt them. There was a confiscated Baby Red Ear in an aquarium with fish. For some reason they could not figure out how they were missing fish. Ha Ha Why did they not know? There was an Alligator Snapper who did not want to be bothered unless I was stoking his shell. Then there was Pug. I don’t know what he was except land box turtle but he was a character. He had part of his face missing including his nose but it did not seem to slow him down. He was kept in a tank with a snake called Butterscotch who could not be released because they had no idea what he was.These two got along well since we fed Pug earth worms and Butterscotch got thawed frozen mice.I found them one day having a little argument. Pug was sucking the juice out of Butterscotch’s mouse and he was trying to get his mouse back. I put Pug out on the floor but he tried to get back in the tank.Keep in mind that even turtles have personalities. I did not realize this until I had hands on access to them. They have friends and they have others they just won’t associate with. Pug bonded to me and would come when I called him. He had such a sweet personality.Sorry for the long post or even the post. You triggered a memory and I wanted to share. I don’t know what it is about getting old that I feel I need to share my memories.

I love turtles and I think all of the species considered are beautiful but, if it was me, I would go with the ones that need to be adopted the most.

It’s ok Liz. I love your stories! And I do agree that they have a a lot of personality. I actually have experience with tortoises and land turtles. More than I do with water turtles though, hence the research.In fact, we have a 70 year old tortoise named Murtle, living in the back yard right now. My parents found her on the side of the road, with a moldy shell and a number painted on it. She’s an indigenous species, but was captive bred, shown by her lack of fear in humans. They got a guide from the Arizona desert museum on how to house and care for her, and since then, the entire yard has been built to accommodate for her.She definitely seems to know how spoiled she is, too. She likes to have the whole yard to herself, and any other tortoises of her species are considered intruders. She seems to be ok tolerating other species, oddly enough. We once had a box turtle that would follow her everywhere. After a few unsuccessful attempts of trying to scare her away, Murtle finally got used to her, and they ended up sharing any hole that Murtle would dig. The box turtle was too, an indigenous species. She blew into our front yard during a storm that was so bad, it knocked down 18 power poles. After taking her in, we found out that she was actually wild, and decided that she wasn’t happy enough being confined only to our yard. So we eventually released her.I do plan on adopting the ones that need a home a most, and I’ve come to the conclusion that it would most likely be an adult red eared slider. People love them when they’re small, not so much when they get larger. I’ll make the final decision when I make the appointment and see what they have once the time comes, though. But I did find out that an African sideneck turtle would not do well. Since they’re mud turtles, they prefer shallow water, with the maximum depth being 12 inches. Though there is a bit of a “shelf” on the edge of the pond, the deepest part of it is 3 feet, so it would not work out. So I guess that narrows down to reeves, painted, and slider. I’ll need a big enough basking space, but other than that, we seem to be good already. The pond was actually built with smaller turtles in mind (though I found out that small pond turtles don’t seem to exist), but it’s still big enough for a larger one, so I’m thinking of a dock surrounding the fountain that’s in the middle of the pond (the fountain is part of the filter we have).