So I went to visit the parrots

The store is called, “PJ’s Pets”. I’ve heard some good things about that place in regards to the staff’s knowledge on parrots as well as their upbringing.They currently have a:-Bare eyed cockatoo-Rainbow lory-Alexandrine-Jardine’s-Green cheek conures-Sun conures-Blue quaker-Meyer’s-Senegal-Congo grey-Budgies-Cockatiels-Other parakeets that I’ve never seen beforeSo I didn’t get to take photos of every bird, because I got distracted handling the birds/talking to the employee. But I still took some!The Jardine’s was absolutely gorgeous, and smitten! He’s going through a moult right now, so his feathers are quite shaggy. He’s been there for about 2 years and is said to be kind of nervous. I’m blaming it on the lack of fully fledging/ adequate love. When I took him out, he delivered a bite that resembled a pair of metal pliers snapping on to my finger. No bruise, no cut. Just a very strong pressure punch. Oh, he also has a pretty loud call. The pitch isn’t high, but definitely a strong, powerful voice. Nonetheless, I was smitten!The Meyer’s that I handled was quite skittish. He looked calm on my hand, but apparently has a reputation for freaking out out of the blue. One observation I made was that his screech was not a birdie scream I’m used to… it was a very very very high pitched, ear piercing squeak you hear from heavy machinery. Now, I’m not talking sun conure screech, that’s LOW pitched compared to a Meyer’s. I’m talking metal vs metal screech. I’m someone who doesn’t mind birdie vocalizations, but the Meyer’s is a no no no for me.The blue quaker baby had severe problems. As soon as I took him out, he was flapping wildly everywhere. He just wanted to take off somewhere his cut wings wouldn’t allow. He didn’t bite once, and since he was just a baby he seemed to calm down by my cradling. But quickly, he went back to his wild flapping. I had to put him back. Poor birdie has insecurities, I don’t think the breeder he came from handled him well or provided much love.The numerous green cheeks I met were all nippy, but no serious bites. No surprise on the nippyness.The Alexandrine was a talker, he would say, “hiiii” to lure people to his cage and WHAM. He was evil, but cute.The rainbow lorikeet was also a talker, mumbling, “hi” to himself. He doesn’t like fingers, he would lunge.The bare eyed cockatoo was an absolute sweetie. He had his face and beak pushed against the bars so anyone could give him a rub. He looked like he could sit there and receive cuddles all day if possible. The senegal was still weaning, and an absolute sweetheart. He cuddled in my arms for as long as I held him. No biting, just love.The congo grey was still weaning, but sold so I couldn’t interact with him.--------------Now, overall my experience was that most birds were skittish/had behavioural problems anywhere from minor to major. They also NEVER let their birds fly around. The babies aren’t fledged at all, and I think this is a big reason why none of the birds there show any confidence. I especially feel sorry for the baby grey that is sold. It will be clipped as soon as it weans, never having had a chance to fly. I remember reading often that such a sensitive bird like a grey ABSOLUTELY needs to be fully fledged. I wouldn’t buy a bird from this store, unless I took it home on its last feeding, not giving them a chance to clip the bird. Oh, one good thing I praise PJ’s is that they don’t sell unweaned birds with a few exceptions when the owner has reserved the bird already, and it is on one feeding a day.

I’m jealous. We don’t have any really good bird stores here. The pet shops we do have keep their birds in tiny cages with no toys and an acrylic front.

I’ve visited a PJ’s pet before and it reminded me a lot of a chain that used to exist under the name “Super Pet”. And it both case, I found that staff had at least some knowledge about parrots. The birds are also generally kept in proper cage and supplied with quite a few toys.

The blue quaker baby had severe problems. As soon as I took him out, he was flapping wildly everywhere. He just wanted to take off somewhere his cut wings wouldn’t allow. He didn’t bite once, and since he was just a baby he seemed to calm down by my cradling. But quickly, he went back to his wild flapping. I had to put him back. Poor birdie has insecurities, I don’t think the breeder he came from handled him well or provided much love.I wouldn’t jump straight to the original breeder not handling or loving up the baby. This is where my personal view of baby raising comes in - I don’t care if a baby’s been fledged, abundance weaned, cuddled up and loved by the original breeder - I feel if the baby’s not had any experiences during its time with the breeder such as meeting new people, leaving the breeder’s baby area, gone outside in a carrier, etc. I think it’s traumatic then to immediately upon weaning send the baby off to a pet store or even a new home. I think that may be causing some of the insecurity issues in newly weaned babies. I feel, I’m mommy. My babies have a very limited time with me. As mommy I need to prepare them for their future and expose them to things while they have me for familiarity and security; then they can go to their new homes and be already accustomed to change. I’ve shown them in their short time with me that the world is not scary, new people are not scary. People are focusing a lot on the fledging and abundance weaning. I personally don’t think/see those things make a huge difference in birdie self esteem without all the other socializing experiences I give them. I currently fledge my babies as that’s the current “good” thing to do for them. However, having raised babies previously never flown and now raising them flying; I have mixed emotions about the fledging thing.

I think you’re right with the socializing aspect. I was directing at the breeder for this Quaker’s particular case because the employee told me they got him in just a few days ago. Overall, almost every bird was nervous, and I also think the employees only take out them briefly if a customer wants to see one.

I think it’s even WORSE for a breeder to love up their babies, not socialize, and then send them off where ever at weaning.It’s like a child in a very loving home, then WHAM, they end up in an orphanage. Talk about emotional trauma.

patdbunny wrote:I think it’s even WORSE for a breeder to love up their babies, not socialize, and then send them off where ever at weaning.It’s like a child in a very loving home, then WHAM, they end up in an orphanage. Talk about emotional trauma.Totally!The employee at one point was going on about how she thinks it’s better to buy a parrot from a store because the bird is used to a set schedule, which encourages independence and is also exposed to various people on a daily basis. She said there are some breeders who cuddle their birds all the time and love them lots, but the babies have social anxiety once they’re out in the ‘real world’.

Yes, exactly.I’ve had really scared, tame parrots that people have said “Oh, it must have been abused or neglected by the last owner.” I usually don’t have that as my first thought. My first thought is the poor bird was actually loved too much by the first owner and now can’t cope with losing that owner. A neglected bird seems more neurotic than fearful. Kinda like Mrstweet’s Cupcake. It’s like having a really intense love affair and then losing it. You’re more traumatized by the loss. Whereas if you have a not so intense relationship, you deal better if it ends.

Cute pictures, but budgies are in the glass