Top 3 Things You Would Tell All New Parrot Owners

What are the top three things you would tell all new parrot owners? I know we’re all gung-ho on offering advice when people are lost and need it, but if we were able to compile a list of things to give every single new parrot owner, what would your top three “must know” items be? Mine would be: 1. Think of parrot ownership like a marriage. Before you get married, you date people to find your perfect fit. Don’t buy the first bird you see because it’s pretty; buy the one you fit with and you’ll be more likely to have a successful relationship. And remember, all marriages take work. Parrot ownership is no different. 2. Don’t be afraid to shop around for just the right avian vet. You wouldn’t go to a doctor for your check-ups if you didn’t like them. Why take your bird to a doctor you don’t like? 3. Don’t trust people who tell you a bird is quiet. Quiet is relative to what each person has an ability to tolerate. Find videos online of your ideal bird screaming and crank that volume up for a good ten minutes. Ideally, go find an adult bird that you’re looking to buy and let it scream at you for a good ten minutes. Then judge whether you can tolerate the sound or not.

Don’t trust people who say this species of bird never bites…

Are you asking about new owners (as in they got a bird already and need advice) or prospective parrot owners?? Cause if it’s someone who doesn’t have a bird but wants one, my advice would mostly be fughetaboutit. Most people who think they want a parrot don’t really want a parrot. They have no idea what they are getting themselves into. I sure didn’t, just was lucky that it worked out and was right for me.If its to a new owner, then to food manage, tame/train, keep it flighted.

Michael wrote:Are you asking about new owners (as in they got a bird already and need advice) or prospective parrot owners?? Cause if it’s someone who doesn’t have a bird but wants one, my advice would mostly be fughetaboutit. Most people who think they want a parrot don’t really want a parrot. They have no idea what they are getting themselves into. I sure didn’t, just was lucky that it worked out and was right for me.If its to a new owner, then to food manage, tame/train, keep it flighted.Why would you tell someone to forget about it? I was pretty sure I wanted a parrot. I knew all of the work that went into it and thought they’d be a good fit for me and my living situation. I did a ton of research about which parrot I wanted to jump in with. Clearly not every owner does that, but I think the ones that do are fairly certain by the time they purchase one that owning a parrot is for them. I do agree with having no idea what they’re getting themselves into, though. I figured owning a parrot was going to be a lot of work and life changing for me, but I underestimated exactly how labor intensive it is.

Don’t bite off more than you can chew. When I first got Bonnie and Clyde, I was a bit over whelmed by trying to tame two birds at once, and they are just budgies.

This is what I actually do tell people who call or email me, and more:1. Don’t get a bird for its beauty. The novelty of the beauty wears off in 3-6 months.2. Don’t get a bird if you don’t like noise.3. Don’t get a bird if you want something to play with on weekends.fughetaboutit. Most people who think they want a parrot don’t really want a parrot. They have no idea what they are getting themselves into. I sure didn’tUnfortunately, even if someone’s done a lot of research, played with birds at petshops or friends’ bird it’s sometimes a whole different experience actually living with them. Prior to meeting me my husband had had cockatiels, budgies, finches. Prior to our marriage I had a jenday conure, two cockatiels and an african grey. He got to play with them and the birds hung out at his apartment when we were dating, but the birds didn’t actually live with him until we moved in together. Just a few days ago my husband and I were discussing that he really didn’t expect the amount of noise, mess, and destruction until they were actually living with him. That was a big shock to him. And my birds spent a lot of time at his apartment when we were dating. My husband was also saying that he completely did not expect the destruction a large bird can do until we got our M2. He says they’re as destructive as a large dog, but the birds never outgrow the destruction and the birds live a lot longer than dogs. My husband says given his current knowledge of parrots, he would not own one if it were his choice.I think fostering parrots before actually owning one is probably a really good idea if someone’s new to birds.

patdbunny wrote:Just a few days ago my husband and I were discussing that he really didn’t expect the amount of noise, mess, and destruction until they were actually living with him. That was a big shock to him. And my birds spent a lot of time at his apartment when we were dating. My husband was also saying that he completely did not expect the destruction a large bird can do until we got our M2. He says they’re as destructive as a large dog, but the birds never outgrow the destruction and the birds live a lot longer than dogs. My husband says given his current knowledge of parrots, he would not own one if it were his choice.I was thinking about the same things in relation to my boyfriend. His brother and nephew have birds (amazon, six cockatiels) and he’s been around them. His parents had budgies when he was a child. But he’s never really lived with the noise and destruction birds can make. Then I realized that he routinely cranks up the bass on his stereo at 3:30 in the morning and I figured the birds and I will probably be the ones telling HIM to shut up and go to bed.

A few of my friends actually said they want a huge talking parrot to carry on their shoulder, after finding out I have parrots.It royally pisses me off when people think birds are easy, because they’re birds.My initial reaction is to scare them away, saying that they will likely bleed regularly and be exposed to the chance of facial disfiguration/ permanent hearing loss. My belief is that most people who go, “aww I want a parrot” say that for the flashy colors and the talking ability. Unless someone shows genuine interest, I don’t really advocate parrot ownership because it would attract more irresponsibles than responsibles.Now the 3 tips I would say are:1. Parrots are very messy, destructive, and often extremely noise. Be prepared for the next 30-80 years. They are harder and more expensive to own than a dog or a cat.2. Join an Internet forum and research on the dietary and enrichment needs of a bird. You will find better, accurate information on a forum as opposed to a pet store or someone you know.3. Spend at least a few months researching the right species for you. If possible, go interact with as many birds as possible via rescue/ shops.

  1. Ignore any descriptions you read about a birds noise-level and experience it for yourself. 2. You, and your stuff, WILL get pooped on3. Don’t think it’s fun to have one on your shoulder, unless getting your ear bit, shirt chewed and having crap run down your back sounds fun to you . Also removing an unwilling parrot from your shoulder is like trying peel a piece of double-sided, extra-sticky tape from your hair.

removing an unwilling parrot from your shoulder is like trying peel a piece of double-sided, extra-sticky tape from your hair.LOL